Male Military Spouses Cope With Added Challenges, Expert Says

Male Military Spouses Cope With Added Challenges, Expert Says

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Image: – – Macho Spouse

 

WASHINGTON, Aug. 3, 2011 – Brian Campbell knew some challenges were in store for him after he left his Navy career to follow his military wife across the country.

But what he didn't count on were the additional challenges brought on not by his status as a military spouse, but by his gender.


“I was the first [nonmilitary] male spouse in that command ever,” Campbell said in a podcast posted on Military OneSource.

Seeking social connections, Campbell looked for a spouses' club at their new installation, but instead, found a wives' club.

“I didn't fit into that organization very well,” he said. “In a lot of instances, when you're talking about a spouses' organization, you're going to be the only male in the room.”

Campbell eventually found the social interaction he craved by reaching out to men within his wife's command. These connections are vital, he said, and can “help build that social organization that can be lacking for you as a male spouse.”

As a small segment of the overall military population, it can be difficult for service members' civilian husbands to figure out where they fit in, but building strong support networks can help to ward off feelings of isolation, said Scott Stanley, a research professor from the University of Denver and a military family expert. According to the 2010 Military Family Life Project, just 5 percent of active duty service members' civilian spouses are male.

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Male Military Spouses Cope With Added Challenges, Expert Says

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Active-Duty Dad

EverettDaughter-220.jpgIf we string Webster Dictionary's definitions of "active," "duty," and "dad" together we get "active dad dutifully taking care of his child(ren).

All too often I find myself watching dads who are disengaged with their children.  I'll give them the benefit of the doubt that there may be extenuating circumstances that I cannot see.  The Dad may be tired, just come off a long shift of work, not feeling good, or just plain needs a break. I can understand that and I've been there too. By the same token we still need to be active in the rearing of our kids.  Taking the time to be the example of how to interact with the world.  We need to put the cell phones down, stop checking Facebook or emails.  I'll also take into account the physical limitations placed on folks too.  We may not be as flexible in movement as we once were, but we can still try. 

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6 Secrets Stay At Home Dads Won't Tell

So what's it really like being a stay at home dad? Bryan Alkire of kzoodad.com reveals our secrets!



 

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