How will Sequestration affect your military family?

How will Sequestration affect your military family?

image for How will Sequestration affect your military family?

Image: – – Macho Spouse

 

Like many military spouses and families, you may want to know how sequestration will impact your military family in detail, but can't seem to get anything more than, "It's a bad idea." You continue to hear about the billions of dollars to be cut from the DoD budget and how that will negatively impact the readiness of our armed forces in general. Yet, what remains unclear to you is the direct impact sequestration will have on your military family.

For example:

Will sequestration impact the CDC and child care? If so, how?


Maybe you're like me and you want to know how all of this "big picture" talk you're getting translates to your military family lifestyle. Well, the information you need about sequestration, and other moves made in Washington, and how they may impact your military family is out there.

Do you have questions about the upcoming sequestration and how it may affect your family? The DoD Military Family Readiness Council Information Page offers more than just an incredibly long name, they are providing much needed information to military families about what's happening in Washington.

Military.com breaks down How Sequestration Will Affect Your Life by listing specific areas of interest like child care, housing, schools, commissaries, etc. The Military.com post pulls from information provided by the National Military Family Association in the post, The View from the Ledge: The Fiscal Cliff and How it Affects Military Families.

Also, the National Military Family Association has another post worth looking at that provides more information about sequestration, Sequestration: What Does It Mean For Military Families?

These are all great articles filled with information about how sequestration will affect your military family. Make sure you check them out, if you haven't already.

Here's another question that I don't hear anyone talking about. How is sequestration impacting your military family NOW through your active duty spouse? You can answer this question in our community discussion area.

 

Taurus James is an Air Force male military spouse and stay-at-home-dad, minister, musician and composer of Moody instruMental Music. He is also professional IT Consultant and Web Developer with over ten years experience working within various industries. Find out more about Taurus through his blog:

"Faithwalk Music: Faith, Music and Life of a Moody instruMental Musician"

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