MSEJ - Military Service Employment Journal, December 2012

MSEJ - Military Service Employment Journal, December 2012

image for MSEJ - Military Service Employment Journal, December 2012

Image: – – Macho Spouse

 

MSEJ_201212.jpgCheck out the December 2012 Military Service Employment Journal from MSCCN.

Career Advice: PCS Job Search Tips - An employment search can be very daunting, especially in a new area. Here are four tips that really helped me find a position
after our last PCS.

Ask The Experts: Sometimes there are issues with your
job search. You feel like you are spinning your wheels and not really going anywhere – and you wonder why and how you can change it. Below are some questions we have had asked in the last few months that we felt would be helpful to everyone in their job search. We are here to
help should you need any further information or assistance!

'Tis the season to start your job search? Try filling your stockings with cash by landing that dream job going into the New Year. “What do you want for Christmas this year?” If you are answering this age old question with “Dear Santa, I want a new job!” Give yourself an early
gift, just make a visit to MSCCN and CASY for an early present of no-cost employment readiness, on the job training, direct connect, and one-on-one job placement services.


Download the MSEJ here.

See also...

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Get in the Game

AMUNewA.jpgBy John Aldrich, AVP, Military Relations at American Military University

Movember, the grass roots movement to raise awareness about men's health issues is nearly complete, and for those of you who are growing a mustache to show support for the cause, I salute you. For those who didn't participate or weren't aware of Movember, there is always next November.

Just like the mustaches of the Men of Movember, male military spouses come in all shapes and sizes. Some are stay-at-home dads, some run businesses from home, and others balance careers outside the home and taking care of the family.

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I'm not depressed, I just want to be alone!

img-roland-220x130.pngDuring deployment, it is important to recognize the signs and symptoms of depression. According to WebMD, some of the symptoms of depression are:

  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering details, and making decisions
  • Fatigue and decreased energy
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, and/or helplessness
  • Feelings of hopelessness and/or pessimism
  • Insomnia, early-morning wakefulness, or excessive sleeping
  • Irritability, restlessness
  • Loss of interest in activities or hobbies once pleasurable, including sex
  • Overeating or appetite loss
  • Persistent aches or pains, headaches, cramps, or digestive problems that do not ease even with treatment
  • Persistent sad, anxious, or "empty" feelings
  • Thoughts of suicide, suicide attempts
Now, we also have to understand that there is a difference between simply being sad and depression. There is going to be, in most cases, a period of sadness and change associated with deployment. This is normal. It is not uncommon for people to have some of the symptoms of depression, yet not be suffering from depression.
 


 

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