Marine to SAHD: Transitions

Marine to SAHD: Transitions

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Image: – – Macho Spouse

 

AndrewWebPic copy.jpgWhere has the time gone? It seems like yesterday I became a stay-at-home-dad (SAHD) and was asking for help and opinions on everything. I have to say “thank you” to everyone who helped me with this big transition. And speaking of transitions, this one is complete...I am now a SAHD and proud of it! I can now rock a puke-stained jacket, diaper bags, and car seats with pink bows on them with no problem. My days of being a Marine are in the past, I will always love the Corps, but now I have a greater love...my girls.


Like any good Marine, I've fused both worlds together to create a schedule that allows me to get stuff done around the house while my girls attend physical therapy. I actually had to get a white board calendar to help remind me about all our appointments. During the day, this gives me some time for myself...not a lot, but enough. I can say that my transition from Marine to SAHD has mostly been a success because of my ability to keep to this schedule and the support of my wife.

This lifestyle has not been as boring as I thought it would be. The girls have kept me on my toes when it comes to house work, food, and especially the laundry.

My schedule has helped a bunch, but there are a few things that have been problematic. One is that if I need/want to go somewhere, I must pack for at least four hours just in case I'm out when it's feeding time. The second problem has been getting everything packed into the truck within 30 minutes, not possible...I have tried and tried. So now we have to add 30 minutes to our schedule just to pack the car (including the girls) if we want to go out. Quick trips to get meals are a thing of the past. So the transition to SAHD may be complete, but I now face a whole new set of challenges.

Throughout this process, I hope to share my insight on having multiples and hopefully I can still learn a thing or two from the other dads out there. Like, how to pack the vehicle in less than 30 minutes. 

Andrew “Fergie” Ferguson

 

Andrew "Fergie" Ferguson is a disabled Marine Veteran, male military spouse and Stay-At-Home-Dad (SAHD), sharing his progression from Marine to SAHD and giving back to new dads like himself, mostly with multiples.

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30 Ways of Thanks Day #17

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November is Military Families Appreciation Month, and the 2014 Armed Forces Insurance Branch Spouses of the Year (Branch SOYs) want to help everyone, everywhere participate in thanking and honoring military families.

Americans love our military, but many people don't quite know how best to express their gratitude. As National Guard Spouse of the Year Dr. Ingrid Herrera-Yee notes, “saying "thanks" to our military families is something that many want to do, but are at a loss as to how to do it –or in the case of Guard and Reserve, how to find us!”

So the Branch SOYs created #30Ways of Thanks to help. Each day in November, the Branch SOYs will release a video with an action item that people around the country can participate in virtually or locally, individually or in groups. Participants can hash tag #30Ways so that their messages, photos, or videos are spread far and wide. Hash tags #GratefulNation and #MilFamsRock can also be added as a short-hand way to say “You are amazing, military families!” Best of all, the entire #30Ways video collection will be stored on the Branch SOYs' YouTube channel so that it can be repeated in Novembers to come, or whenever someone is looking for a way to say “thank you” to military families.

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PTSD in the Family

The following article on PTSD was written by American Military University faculty member, Craig Gilman.

June is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Awareness Month. The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) states that “PTSD affects about 7.7 million American adults, but it can occur at any age, including childhood. Women are more likely to develop PTSD than men, and there is some evidence that susceptibility to the disorder may run in families.”

Male spouses should note that statistics indicate their female spouses are more likely to develop PTSD than men. All parents should realize that children are susceptible, as well. Visit the NIMH PTSD site for a comprehensive overview of the causes, symptoms, treatments and tips for living with PTSD. If you suspect a loved one might suffer from PTSD, professional diagnosis and counseling should be strongly pursued.   



 

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