Nurturing the Money Tree: Creating Income - Part 1

Nurturing the Money Tree: Creating Income - Part 1

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Image: – – Macho Spouse

 

DirectionDivaLogo.jpgTo work or not to work that is the question on all of our minds at one time or another in our military careers.

It seems that the subject of employment comes up whenever money is tight, when the kids are all finally in school, or you PCS to a new duty station. I can't tell you how many times I have thought about getting a job outside of our home just so we could have a little wiggle room in the budget.

I even tried it one year to get some extra holiday cash, and frankly it was a disaster. Nothing got done, the kids were disappointed because I wasn't home when they came back from college, and my husband hated the fact that his life had to change, not to mention my home business began to struggle as well. (Yes, he is spoiled but the fact that he is a genius on the grill makes up for it)
For some military spouses working outside the home works for them, but for many of us the constant changes, multiple moves and unpredictability of our lives make employment very difficult unless you are fortunate to have a career that can move with you.


JudyDavis.jpgI chose to transition my motivational speaking business and now operate and serve my clients online through my blog and social media. Some people find that careers like nursing, medical billing and the like work best while others, a huge segment of military spouses actually, choose network marketing and home business services because they have the flexibility without having to start all over each time they move.
You may be wondering what options and possibilities are available to you as a military spouse. It isn't easy to find a solution that will work in a life that is full of change and transition, but it is possible. Whether you work for yourself or someone else, there are a few things that you should be aware of and consider before you jump into anything.


Option 1: Working for Someone Else. Depending on your skill set, degree or past employment experience, you may be able to find a full or part-time job in the local community or on the military installation where you are living. There are local and national job placement organizations that specialize in helping active duty families obtain employment. Check your base/post listings for the ones available in your area.
Pro's:
Working insures a consistent paycheck and an increase in your household income.
You can leave your work at the office and enjoy you time off
You are able to use your skills
You are not responsible for the business
Con's:
Sometimes it takes several months to be able to get a job, and employers may not be willing to take you on when you move every 2-3 years.
You must re-establish your career with each PCS and the waiting and break in receiving a paycheck can be frustrating.
Your employer may not be sensitive to your military schedule. They may not allow for time off when your spouse is gearing up for or returning from deployment. Likewise they may not understand your need to change your shift or hours now that you are the only adult at home.


Side Note: If you would like a job but find that you need additional skills, there are many programs and financial aid opportunities that are available to spouses of active duty service members. Hop on the internet and you will be amazed at the options that come up.
Likewise if you are having difficulty finding a job, it may be a perfect time to go back to school and do something you have always dreamed of. You can go to school to get your bachelors degree, become certified in various medical or service professions or learn a specialized skill that is easily transferable when you PCS. One of the things that I did during our first deployment was to get an online Aromatherapy certification. It gave me something to do and now I have a marketable skill that I can use if I choose to go that route (not to mention the amazing health benefits and stress relief aromatherapy provides).

Some great professions for military spouses are:


Medical: Nurse, ABA Therapist, Physical Therapist, Marriage and Family Therapist, Pharmacist, Pharmacy technicians, Social Worker With Military Credential, dental assistants, clinical and medical lab techs, personal care aides, medical record techs, nutritionists, orderlies, Medical Transcription, Medical Coding and Billing
Service: Massage Therapist, Aromatherapy, Cosmetology, Beautician, Barber

 

About the Author:  Judy Davis is a great friend and promoter of Macho Spouse and male military spouses everywhere.  She is a motivational speaker, author, and blogger who provides support to the military community all over the world.  You can find out more about her, read her blogs, or book her as a speaker at http://thedirectiondiva.com/  

See also...

image for The State of Macho Spouse & Where I

The State of Macho Spouse & Where I've Been

MSOYMECrop.jpgWell it's been a while since I've contributed any meaningful content to Macho Spouse and I owe everyone an explanation. No, I haven't decided to hang it up and retire…not yet anyway, quite the opposite really. As some of you already know, last February I was named the Armed Forces Insurance Air Force Spouse of Year, as well as, the AETC (Air Education Training Command) level Joan Orr Air Force Spouse of Year. Being recognized by so many people for the work we've done building a resource for male military spouses was incredibly humbling and an absolute honor. What a great way to start the year! However, I wasn't prepared for the amount of effort and time each of those distinctions would demand. The time I normally spent creating videos and/or blog posts for Macho Spouse was dedicated to new speaking engagements, interviews, articles for other websites and publications, and even a chance to author a small portion of, Stories Around the Table, Laughter, Wisdom, and Strength in Military Life. I had multiple opportunities to speak at many Air Force functions and present Macho Spouse (along with the plight of male military spouses) to the highest levels of civilian and military leadership. Hell, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs coined me! (To my high school counselor who 26 years ago called me a “flake,” you were wrong...so suck it.) Our message is slowly starting to gain traction and people of influence are listening, we just need to continue pushing forward. Anyway, toss in the fact that my wife deployed in March and I was working a full time job, well, there wasn't much time for anything else.

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Being Dad

EverettDaughter.jpgNever really thought about that word “dad” until I became one; however, I focus more on it now than ever before. I find that the word “dad” means more to me today because my own father wasn't there for me when I was growing up, and he's still not around, not even for his own granddaughter. Yes, the word “dad” means more to me now than ever. My ability to be a good father comes from more than one source, and the fact that I choose not to be like my old man is a great motivator. My dad left by way of divorce when I was just seven. There was no custody battle and he was given every opportunity to see his children. Yet he still chose not to be around.



 

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