Military Spouse Career Advancement Account (MyCAA)

Military Spouse Career Advancement Account (MyCAA)

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Did You Know?The Military Spouse Career Advancement Account (MyCAA) provides military spouses the opportunity and financing to receive the training and education needed for portable careers that will persist during the military lifestyle of multiple relocations.


The Department of Defense has funded a maximum benefit of $4,000 with a fiscal cap of $2,000 to eligible military spouses to use toward associated degree programs, licenses, certifications, or credentials leading to employment (not higher degrees). The spouse must finish the program of study within three years from start date of first course.

Eligibility:

  • Spouses of active-duty members: E1-E5, W1-W2 and O1-O2.
  • Spouses of activated Guard & Reserve with the same ranks are also eligible (must be able to start and complete while sponsor is on Title 10 orders.

A military spouse can apply for MyCAA Financial Assistance after creating a MyCAA Career 
and Training Plan on www.MilitaryOneSource.com

For further information, contact MilitaryOneSource at 1-888-342-9647 or visit your base A&FRC.

See also...

image for The Jones Act and the U.S. Military

The Jones Act and the U.S. Military

Maritime LogoThe Merchant Marine Act of 1920, more commonly known as the Jones Act, has been protecting seamen and merchant marines, as well as supporting the U.S. Military for decades. It is a law that allows maritime workers to seek compensation from employers, that regulates commerce in U.S. waterways, and that enforces U.S. law on all vessels in the country, foreign or domestic.

Rights for Mariners and Supporting a Strong Military

One of the most important things the Jones Act does is allow merchant marines and seamen to pursue damages from employers. This is important to the maritime industry in the U.S. because it forces employers to maintain safer work environments and to take responsibility when sloppy safety procedures or other factors lead to an injury or death. The right to seek compensation extends to dependent family members of anyone who dies in a maritime job because of negligence.

The Jones Act is also important in supporting the military. The law forces vessels in the U.S., as well as ports, terminals, and other facilities, to follow laws and to maintain productive and safe maritime work environments. When the U.S. goes to war the military can call ships, ports, technology, and infrastructure into action. The Jones Act ensures that these are in good working order in the event the military needs them.

Providing Information and Resources

MaritimeInjuryCenter.com provides up-to-date and researched information about everything related to maritime laws, especially the Jones Act, current events in the maritime industry, personal injury cases, and legal rights and opportunities. These are made available so that maritime workers, merchant marines, and others have the resources they need to exercise their rights. We can help you get the information you need about maritime legal matters and resources to legal experts. For more information contact our head of advocacy, Dan Griffin, at: Dgriffin@maritimeinjurycenter.com, or https://www.maritimeinjurycenter.com/contact/

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Do You Know Your Military Base Firearm Laws?

Did You Know?

Military Base Firearm Laws can be confusing, especially when you end up living at two different military bases within one year like I did. I own several firearms and the first time I encountered military base firearm laws was during the PCS move when the movers asked me if my firearms were registered on the base. My response..."Huh?"

This incident took place when we had to move from the Pentagon to Maxwell AFB for my wife to go to school. I was already a male military spouse for more than 10 years, but I had never thought about or encountered military base firearm laws. An interesting point to note here is that in my entire time as a male military spouse, we have lived on base once. While this may have had something to do with my not encountering the military base firearm laws before this PCS move, it had nothing to do with my ignorance of the laws.



 

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