2 months or 60 days or 1,440 hours or 86,400 minutes or 5,184,000 seconds

2 months or 60 days or 1,440 hours or 86,400 minutes or 5,184,000 seconds

image for 2 months or 60 days or 1,440 hours or 86,400 minutes or 5,184,000 seconds

Image: Dee Young – Civilian Male Military Spouse Shares About Communication During Deployment – Macho Spouse

 

img-roland-220x130.png  I'm finally over the two month hump and I honestly feel like I've accomplished something! This is the longest that we've been apart since we've been married and the longest I've ever had our daughter by myself. The house, while not quite up to her standards, doesn't exactly look like a tornado's blown through either. I think she has little fairy helpers or something, because I don't know how she managed to work a full day, do our daughter's hair, wash/fold clothes, and still get a decent amount of rest. I helped out a little, but this experience has really shown me how much I hadn't been doing all these years!

 


I've come to the conclusion that the ability to communicate using various internet resources could possibly be some sort of enemy ploy to drive me crazy! I didn't realize that internet speeds as slow as they have over there still existed. Most of the time, it's just enough to tease you into thinking that you're going to be able to have a decent video chatting session. Other times, it just cuts out for no reason and you're left wondering if everything is ok. And then, there are the days when you don't hear anything at all, not even a quick message to say “I love you”. Those are the worst. Sometimes I wish things were like when my Dad deployed to Desert Storm and all you really had were letters in the mail, video tapes sent back and forth, and the occasional phone call. That way I wouldn't worry as much if I didn't hear from her for a day or two. Technology creates unreal expectations and can sometimes make you forget that it's still a war zone and communication will never be normal.

Continue reading....

See also...

image for Check out My Military Life

Check out My Military Life

We have had the opportunity to hang out with the Founder/Director of My Military Life, Wendy Poling, at three different events this year (Inc 500, NMSN , and USAA's Blogger Conference) and she is pretty damn cool. Wendy has been very generous with her time, knowledge, and experience as we try to build Macho Spouse into something special.

image for Which is More Risky, Entrepreneurship or Trying to find Defense-Related Employment After Separation?

Which is More Risky, Entrepreneurship or Trying to find Defense-Related Employment After Separation?

JasonAnderson.jpgEarlier this year I attended my Transition Assistance Program (TAP) class ahead of my planned 1 August 2014 retirement.  After completing the week of training with 25 other military members (both officers and enlisted), I was left with some thoughts about the program and life after the military.


TAP class, whose name is now Transition GPS due the passage of the 2011 Vow to Hire Heroes Act, was heavily geared towards providing military members the tools to become Government Service (GS) employees or defense industry professionals.  I certainly understand why.  After all, everyone in the class served in the military their entire career, some spanning over 30 years.  It makes sense that most would want to capitalize on the skills they acquired during their many years of service.



 

Share on social media

Macho Spouse uses AddThis share buttons so you can easily share your favorite content from this site to your Facebook, Twitter, and more.
To share this on social media, click on the share icons. You will be prompted to connect your social media account if you have not already.
Thank you for sharing!

 

Comments


Got something to say? Sign up or login to participate in the conversation.