OPSEC - What is it?

OPSEC - What is it?

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Image: – – Macho Spouse

 

daveblog.jpgOld Fart going off on another Pet Peeve - OPSEC and Why We Follow It!

Oh! Damn! I couldn't believe it! Some wife of a soldier was complaining about how he never really says much when he Skypes her from down range! Really? Are you that obtuse??


Time for the Old Fart to do some 'splainin' about OPSEC and why it is important. Firstly, why am I an expert on OPSEC? It is because I am an Old Fart, who is a veteran, who served during Cold War II (after Bay of Pigs, before OEF I) onboard U.S. Submarines, and at one time was directly involved with the routing and safety of every ship and submerged ship belonging to NATO in the Atlantic Ocean. Yes, I created more Eyes Only stuff (and subsequently shredded) than most readers can imagine. So, I do know a few things about Operational Security and the now popular OPSEC as defined in DOD JP 1997.

But, before I start on OPSEC, who knows about PERSEC? Anyone? Anyone? (Feel like Ben Stein in the Beuler movie) Anyone?

PERSEC is us parents teaching the kids Stranger Danger, making sure our SSNs are kept private, guarding our phone numbers and addresses from the creepy guy down at the corner. PERSEC keeps our kids safe. OPSEC keeps our other kid safe, the one who raised her hand (or his, I know some wives are reading) and has placed his/her life in the way of future unforseen jeapordy.

Yeah, yeah, yeah, this is the day and age of high technology, and there really are no secrets. You are absolutely correct. BUT. The enemy may already know the facts, they just need someone to VERIFY the fact so they can act upon it. Do you want to be the one who gets GI Jane to tell you exactly where she is so you can zoom in on Google Maps? Do you want to be the one who then gets caught (yep, our side will catch her) verifying the location of the next rocket barrage? Are you protecting your kid who is there in harms way by fulfilling a STUPID DESIRE to know exactly where they are? Don't do it!

Likewise, don't work out some lame code to pass info home... our side has tons of spooks (guys and gals who live to break codes) who are bored. You will get caught.

So, lady - the one who made me write this rant... are you really upset because he doesn't tell you much? I would be happy to know my soldier can find time to Skype me and say she loves me! All I need to know, it'll get me through the next 90 to 120 days!

'Nuff said, Old Fart out.

See also...

image for The Jones Act and the U.S. Military

The Jones Act and the U.S. Military

Maritime LogoThe Merchant Marine Act of 1920, more commonly known as the Jones Act, has been protecting seamen and merchant marines, as well as supporting the U.S. Military for decades. It is a law that allows maritime workers to seek compensation from employers, that regulates commerce in U.S. waterways, and that enforces U.S. law on all vessels in the country, foreign or domestic.

Rights for Mariners and Supporting a Strong Military

One of the most important things the Jones Act does is allow merchant marines and seamen to pursue damages from employers. This is important to the maritime industry in the U.S. because it forces employers to maintain safer work environments and to take responsibility when sloppy safety procedures or other factors lead to an injury or death. The right to seek compensation extends to dependent family members of anyone who dies in a maritime job because of negligence.

The Jones Act is also important in supporting the military. The law forces vessels in the U.S., as well as ports, terminals, and other facilities, to follow laws and to maintain productive and safe maritime work environments. When the U.S. goes to war the military can call ships, ports, technology, and infrastructure into action. The Jones Act ensures that these are in good working order in the event the military needs them.

Providing Information and Resources

MaritimeInjuryCenter.com provides up-to-date and researched information about everything related to maritime laws, especially the Jones Act, current events in the maritime industry, personal injury cases, and legal rights and opportunities. These are made available so that maritime workers, merchant marines, and others have the resources they need to exercise their rights. We can help you get the information you need about maritime legal matters and resources to legal experts. For more information contact our head of advocacy, Dan Griffin, at: Dgriffin@maritimeinjurycenter.com, or https://www.maritimeinjurycenter.com/contact/

image for 30 Ways of Thanks Day #27

30 Ways of Thanks Day #27

30Still.jpgBlue Star Families makes it easy to thank military families. Operation Appreciate lets you send thank you letters to military spouses, kids, and servicemembers. Operation Honor Corps lets you donate volunteer hours in their honor.

November is Military Families Appreciation Month, and the 2014 Armed Forces Insurance Branch Spouses of the Year (Branch SOYs) want to help everyone, everywhere participate in thanking and honoring military families.

Americans love our military, but many people don't quite know how best to express their gratitude. As National Guard Spouse of the Year Dr. Ingrid Herrera-Yee notes, “saying "thanks" to our military families is something that many want to do, but are at a loss as to how to do it –or in the case of Guard and Reserve, how to find us!”

So the Branch SOYs created #30Ways of Thanks to help. Each day in November, the Branch SOYs will release a video with an action item that people around the country can participate in virtually or locally, individually or in groups. Participants can hash tag #30Ways so that their messages, photos, or videos are spread far and wide. Hash tags #GratefulNation and #MilFamsRock can also be added as a short-hand way to say “You are amazing, military families!” Best of all, the entire #30Ways video collection will be stored on the Branch SOYs' YouTube channel so that it can be repeated in Novembers to come, or whenever someone is looking for a way to say “thank you” to military families.



 

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