Entrepreneurship Fundamentals: Becoming the Entrepreneurial CEO


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Entrepreneurship Fundamentals: Becoming the Entrepreneurial CEO

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Image: – – Macho Spouse

 

JasonAnderson.jpgA CEO is that one person who embodies the entirety of the business they represent. They internalize everything about the business and then direct their energy and effort into making good decisions that (hopefully) fall in line with strategies designed to grow the business into profitability.

What makes an Entrepreneurial CEO so special is their humble starting point. While CEOs of existing companies have resources, a staff, and money to operationalize their actions, an Entrepreneurial CEO typically has none of that. You are the resource. You set the framework from which to organize, then layout the business' milestones and timelines in pursue of the desired end state. You also have the challenge of simultaneously balancing present-day tasks with long-range planning and being able to effectively communicate that to the team. And ultimately, you are the one responsible for how well (or not) things turn out. Sound intimidating? It is! But you have some things working in your favor.


Remember that Entrepreneurship is a Process

Entrepreneurship is a process. As you read this Blog, don't let your mind get off track by focusing exclusively on the enormity of work that must take place to conceptualize, develop, and launch a small business in its totality. Instead, understand that you can tackle each task, one at a time, and over time can cover a lot of ground. As your experience grows, so does the complexity and number of tasks. Each step will help you build your small business database and acumen.

To help you in your journey, the best asset you have is your time in the military and the Active-Duty Entrepreneur Model. The bedrock of your support is a stable job that provides consistent income. Beyond that, you and your family have free (or very low cost) healthcare and a defined career timeline from which you can plan for separation or retirement.

With the ADE model working for you, you can make well thought-out decisions that are less subject to external pressure because you do not have to prematurely field your product or service to put food on the dinner table. Instead, you have more control over your timeline and can take action that will help you mature into a more effective business leader.

Judgment and Picking the Right Team

As the Entrepreneurial CEO, in many ways, you are the business. No one else has put in the time, effort, and energy you have. You know what your business is, what it can become, and how to get it there. However, at some point, you will need others to do the work you are either unable to do or don't have the time to do.

The world is teeming with talent, but the great ones are hard to find. When you seek people to do contract work for you, don't fall into the trap of thinking that big-name brands will have the best talent. Likewise, don't assume those advertising on Craig's List can't get the job done. Finding the right people is an iterative process that take times and effort. Be patient and keep looking for the right people for your business. Look for those you can trust and who can do good, consistent, and dependable work for you. When you find the right team, be sure to take care of them!

Use Your Gut and Be Fearless

Becoming an Active-Duty Entrepreneur is a supreme challenge but can also provide tremendous satisfaction and fulfillment. Make your business the focal point from which to make sound, well thought-out decisions. When the road is uncertain and the 100% “correct” choice is not clear—and this will happen—make a gut decision, be fearless and execute it to the best of you and your team's ability. These moments, more than any other, are the ones that help you become the Entrepreneurial CEO.

I would like to hear your thoughts on the post. Please comment below.

About the Author: Jason Anderson is a 19 year USAF Lietenant Colonel who is also a small business owner and author of the book, "Active Duty Entrepreneur." You can follow Jason on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/activedutyentrepreneur) and Twitter (https://twitter.com/ADEntrepreneur1). To read more from Jason and to order his book, follow this link: http://activedutyentrepreneur.com/


 


See also...

image for Drink, Drank, Drunk: Wading Though Military Life

Drink, Drank, Drunk: Wading Though Military Life

Daddy-Ian-Beer.jpgThe author, Chris Field, demonstrating some "top-shelf" parenting while at Epcot's Biergarten.

 

There seems to be a common thread running through military sociability: booze. It's the thread that allows you to tie one on just about anytime. It's everywhere. At the Exchange, at the local Class Six…hell, you might even score some free booze from those distributors hosting tasting events throughout the year. Play your cards right, and you could be half in the bag before the sun even goes down.
When I first drive through the gates, there's always the sign telling me how many days it's been since the last alcohol related incident on post. And when that sign 'resets' back to 1, I'm always tempted to check it out: “Uh oh, what did (one of a handful of likely suspects) do now?” Thankfully, I've never triggered it myself. Yet.

image for Military Spouse Employment Survey

Military Spouse Employment Survey

MOAASheild2.jpgHey guys, have you taken this survey yet?  Stuff like this is important because it may help you find work in the future, as well as, future generations of military spouses!

http://www.moaa.org/milspousesurvey/

The Military Officers Association of America (MOAA), a non-profit organization that advocates for military personnel and their families, is teaming up with Syracuse University's Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF) to launch the Military Spouse Employment Survey.

Military spouses face many challenges to both employment and career advancement as a result of the military lifestyle. This imperative study will look at the employment pattern of all military spouses, especially related to their long-term career trajectories. We encourage all active duty, National Guard, reserve, veteran, and surviving spouses who are 18 years and older to participate by sharing their stories, experiences and lessons learned.

According to the 2010 Department of Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC), there are approximately 725,877 spouses of Active Duty service members and approximately 413,295 spouses of Reserve and Guard members. In addition, it is estimated that there are more than 15 million veterans' spouses in the United States and over 5.8 million surviving spouses. By adding their voice, we can build a stronger foundation for military spouses' professional needs, identify any barriers to career development and share their stories with government officials, state, and federal policy makers in order to overcome obstacles and improve the quality of life for our service members and their families.

The Military Spouse Employment Survey will open on September 16, 2013 and remain open for 30 days. This survey icompletely anonymous, for research purposes and therefore completely voluntary. The survey will take approximately 30 minutes to complete.   

 


 

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