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image for K9s for Warriors PTSD treatment for Veterans

K9s for Warriors PTSD treatment for Veterans

Here's an article, showing a new avenue in PTSD treatment devoid of pharmaceuticals.

Purdue and K9s for Warriors are conducting new studies with veterans suffering from PTSD. K9s rescues, trains, then pairs service dogs with veterans and have a 99% success rate among graduates. 

Posted in Health
image for How To Manage Stress

How To Manage Stress

Stress affects almost everyone. Before you became a new civilian male military spouse, you probably experienced stress. Now, you will probably experience stress in different ways and more frequently.

Sometimes, it can be a good thing because it can energize us to meet new challenges or changes. But if it's not managed, stress can affect your physical and emotional health, your relationships, and your life.

Whether you're a civilian male military spouse or not, below you will find a few tips on how to manage stress.

Posted in Health
image for What is No Shave Movember?

What is No Shave Movember?

I learned about Movember from John Aldrich, AVP, Military Relations at American Military University via his post Get In The Game

Movember, the grass roots movement to raise awareness about men's health issues is nearly complete, and for those of you who are growing a mustache to show support for the cause, I salute you. For those who didn't participate or weren't aware of Movember, there is always next November.

After checking out what it was about, I started last November 2016 and continued without shaving (or cutting my hair) up until September 2017.

Since then, I have gained a better understanding of the movement and become more intentional about  my health, fitness and wellness.

Posted in Health
image for How Do I Shop for New Health Insurance Coverage?

How Do I Shop for New Health Insurance Coverage?

OK, here is an important topic USAA wrote about a few months ago and we obtained permission to re-post on Macho Money. 

For those of you who are new to the military, you will receive your health insurance from Tricare.  Tricare is offered to all active duty members and their dependents.  Once your active duty spouse retires, your family is eligible for Tricare For Life.  However, if you guys decide to separate from the military before retirement qualifications are met, you aren't eligible for Tricare. 

At this point the VA may be an option, but there are specific eligibility requirements, so not everyone will qualify...plus the VA doesn't cover dependents.  So, for many of us, the pain of shopping for health insurance is inevitable.

 

Posted in Macho Money
image for SAHD Life: Are You a Sad-At-Holidays-Dad with Depression, Anxiety, Loneliness?

SAHD Life: Are You a Sad-At-Holidays-Dad with Depression, Anxiety, Loneliness?

When I was a boy, I loved the holidays. I had great anticipation and excitement during Christmas. I loved being with family and friends during Thanksgiving. Food, football and fellowship are what I looked forward to the most.

But then something happened. I didn't know exactly when, but I was definitely a grown-up at the time when I started dreading the holidays. Thanksgiving and Christmas became the worst times of the year for me. The things I loved about these holidays and anticipated as a boy, I hated as a man and a father.

image for Did you know?

Did you know?

did-you-know-mms.gifWe have all heard of the benefit of a good healthy diet. Included is the surge of Greek Yoghurt and all of the fabulous flavors that they have come up with. But did you know that 1 particular flavor should be avoided from our servicemembers diet?

Posted in Male Spouse 101
image for Real Food for Real Men

Real Food for Real Men

Fellow male military spouse, Billy McFarland, started a new Facebook page about healthy eating and healthy living for men.  According to Billy, he started this while stuck at home during his wife's time in the field, deployments and training.  He plans to cover everything from what to eat and how to cook.

Posted in Health
image for PTSD in the Family

PTSD in the Family

The following article on PTSD was written by American Military University faculty member, Craig Gilman.

June is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Awareness Month. The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) states that “PTSD affects about 7.7 million American adults, but it can occur at any age, including childhood. Women are more likely to develop PTSD than men, and there is some evidence that susceptibility to the disorder may run in families.”

Male spouses should note that statistics indicate their female spouses are more likely to develop PTSD than men. All parents should realize that children are susceptible, as well. Visit the NIMH PTSD site for a comprehensive overview of the causes, symptoms, treatments and tips for living with PTSD. If you suspect a loved one might suffer from PTSD, professional diagnosis and counseling should be strongly pursued.   

Posted in Health
image for I Will SAVE America

I Will SAVE America

JoshPicCrop2.jpgDid you know a total of 66% of Americans over the age of 20 are overweight, with a whopping 34% of those being obese.  And did you know that a little over 9 million children in America are overweight or obese?  Can you believe that a total of $1.7 trillion dollars goes toward treating overweight Americans annually?

Let's take a look at what happens to your body when you are overweight/obese.  If you “live” in this category, the door is open for you to have many different types of health problems that include high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, high cholesterol, and certain types of cancer.  All of which lead to a shortened life expectancy and a decreased quality of life.

Posted in Health
image for SAHD Life: Being a Strong-And-Healthy-Dad

SAHD Life: Being a Strong-And-Healthy-Dad

james-family-220.jpgI get these "google alerts" every day, which are basically just articles and posts from around the web related to certain keywords I want to monitor. "SAHD" and "Stay-At-Home-Dad" are keywords I monitor and I have been getting a great deal of posts.

Much of the stuff that I'm seeing regarding SAHD is still in the "novelty" range, or the "Awww, that's cute" range. I also check out websites that give the spouse's perspective - you know, the women who live with these dudes. These sites are way more interesting to me than the talk about the latest television show depicting SAHDs.

Anyway, I haven't seen much about the health of SAHDs. In all of my monitors and in all of the web surfing I've done on the topic of SAHDs, I have not come across any health-related posts. I found that very interesting.

image for I

I'm not depressed, I just want to be alone!

img-roland-220x130.pngDuring deployment, it is important to recognize the signs and symptoms of depression. According to WebMD, some of the symptoms of depression are:

  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering details, and making decisions
  • Fatigue and decreased energy
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, and/or helplessness
  • Feelings of hopelessness and/or pessimism
  • Insomnia, early-morning wakefulness, or excessive sleeping
  • Irritability, restlessness
  • Loss of interest in activities or hobbies once pleasurable, including sex
  • Overeating or appetite loss
  • Persistent aches or pains, headaches, cramps, or digestive problems that do not ease even with treatment
  • Persistent sad, anxious, or "empty" feelings
  • Thoughts of suicide, suicide attempts
Now, we also have to understand that there is a difference between simply being sad and depression. There is going to be, in most cases, a period of sadness and change associated with deployment. This is normal. It is not uncommon for people to have some of the symptoms of depression, yet not be suffering from depression.
 
Posted in Depression